CADAVERIC hands-on course and live surgeries session at KIMS

Bhubaneshwar: Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences (KIMS-Bhubaneswar), which is creating state-of-the-art infrastructure to deliver advanced spine treatment, witnessed live spine surgeries today by eminent surgeons from across the country, capping off the four-day ICS 2022 organized by the Association of Spine Surgeons of India (ASSI).

The demonstration was conducted for 100 participants for those who completed the Spine Instruction Course (ICS 2022), exposing them to the advancement of spine surgery. A cadaveric spine workshop was also held to demonstrate the skills of ASSI members under the leadership of Dr. Shankar Acharya, President of ASSI. Other leading spine surgeons such as Dr. S. S Kale, Dr. Ajoy Shetty, Dr. CS Dhillon and Dr. Shankar Acharya have performed surgeries live.

Professor NK Das HOD Neurosurgery KIMS coordinated all surgeries with all local faculties. Dr. Acharya explained that the live spine surgery demonstration at KIMS has benefited the participating young spine surgeons, as training and improving knowledge in spinal surgery is very essential for professional excellence, in addition to adopting computer-assisted surgeries for more precision.

“It takes more than two decades to train a spine surgeon perfectly to meet industry expectations and make the surgeon attuned to the latest navigation technologies. So, workshops like ICS 2022 play a huge role in training a new spine surgeon who wants to learn the tricks and get used to new technology, he explained.

“Technology is changing, so now we’re using computer navigation, with real-time neurological monitoring. We’re doing spine surgery implants, and we’re doing it navigationally. We’re all in a different sphere together,” On the establishment of state-of-the-art spine centers in cities like Bhubaneswar, Dr. Acharya said, “It’s good to start a center, but invest wisely and Getting the right dedicated and passionate spine surgeon to handle it takes a lot of time. We want to have a team first. You can get an F-16 and park it somewhere, but without a trained fighter pilot, d others would crush the giant machine, so training surgeons without proper training would lead to disaster.

Sharing his dream of creating a “pool of qualified spine surgeons across the country”, Dr. Acharya said that “in my 25 years as a spine surgeon, I have trained about 20 spine surgeons qualified so far. So, it is the quality that always counts in spine surgery, otherwise the unskilled or untrained surgeon would end up with multiple accidents involving human lives.”

PREVENTIVE CARE

Although he advocates the creation of high-tech spine centers and the spread of technology-based surgeries for precision and delivery, Dr. Acharya believes that preventive care for better spine health, the public awareness of trauma care and minimization of road accidents should be followed by all.

“You have to realize that if a winning member of a family becomes a paraplegic, then the whole family suffers miserably and therein lies the fact that the safety and security of the brain, of the spine is of a paramount importance, making people understand what to do and what not to do in everyday life and especially when we move,” he observed.

“It might cost Rs 10 crore or even more to build a state-of-the-art OT for spinal surgery, but it would take very less to raise awareness of reducing road accidents and reducing spinal injuries and loss of life, so the ball is in the court of preventative care and what we should be doing about it,” explained the famed spine surgeon.

At the inaugural session on November 3, ASSI expressed its willingness to partner with KIIT-KIMS and offer critical spine-related care and treatment to the tribal population of Odisha.

Dr Acharya had said the association was focused on creating a new group of spine surgeons, among other areas, including providing essential training to ensure the best treatment. The founder of the KIIT group of institutions, Dr. Achyuta Samanta also addressed the inaugural ceremony.

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