Computer research – Cetril http://cetril.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 16:06:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cetril.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Computer research – Cetril http://cetril.org/ 32 32 Ericsson invests several million pounds in the British 6G research program https://cetril.org/ericsson-invests-several-million-pounds-in-the-british-6g-research-program/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 16:06:46 +0000 https://cetril.org/ericsson-invests-several-million-pounds-in-the-british-6g-research-program/ Communications technology and services provider Ericsson is to establish a research unit in the UK as part of a multi-million pound investment to boost the country’s future wireless connectivity capabilities. In total, Ericsson has pledged to invest tens of millions of pounds over the next 10 years in a UK-based program that will focus […]]]>

Communications technology and services provider Ericsson is to establish a research unit in the UK as part of a multi-million pound investment to boost the country’s future wireless connectivity capabilities.

In total, Ericsson has pledged to invest tens of millions of pounds over the next 10 years in a UK-based program that will focus on 6G research and breakthrough innovations. The company predicted that 6G will merge the digital and physical world, contribute to a smarter, sustainable and efficient society, and help deliver new use cases that include multi-sensory extended reality, precision healthcare, agriculture, the collaborative robot (cobot), and intelligent autonomous systems.

These are all considered by Ericsson to be key elements of the future global digital infrastructure for society, industries and consumers. “Ericsson has been connecting the UK for more than 120 years, and this new investment underscores our continued commitment to ensuring the country remains a global leader in the technologies and industries of the future,” said Katherine Ainley, CEO of Ericsson UK & Ireland.

“Our vision of a more connected, secure and sustainable world is shared by the UK government, and we look forward to working with network operators, industries and academia to develop international standards that will bring us ever closer together. of achieving truly revolutionary connectivity and innovation.

The research program will employ 20 dedicated researchers and support additional PhD students who will work alongside leading academics, CSPs and industry partners to conduct 6G research projects that contribute to the development of global technology, innovation networks and new product services. Areas of research will include network resilience and security, artificial intelligence, cognitive networks and energy efficiency.

“Ericsson is at the forefront of global research, innovation and the development of open standards that will underpin a future of limitless connectivity and new technologies, said Magnus Frodigh, vice president and head of Ericsson Research. .

“Establishing a research agenda in the UK means the country will be well placed to use its high international standard of knowledge in wireless systems and technologies to produce ground-breaking 6G research that not only can help shape the future of global standards, but also to provide a more connected, efficient and sustainable society.

The UK research investment announcement builds on Ericsson’s current work in the 5G sector of the country’s telecoms industry and supports the government’s ambition to be a leader in the development of future communications and global standards. Announcing the new facility, Ainley highlighted the work Ericsson had done in 5G and revealed that the company would also be accelerating its presence in the UK enterprise 5G world.

“We earlier announced our first on-demand network slicing child with Vodafone [this] year, and it’s been fantastic to be of service,” she said.

“I’m very excited about the company: there are so many exciting use cases. [For example] at the Port of Tyne, which we did with BT around a 5G private network. It seeks to optimize its container traffic by using [the 5G private network] but it also plans to test things like driverless vehicles and have a clean energy testbed. It’s a great example of the partnership we have.

“And then there’s energy efficiency, a very hot topic right now,” Ainley said. “We’ve had a few announcements about this in this space around radios. Earlier in the year we announced a new radio that we have developed with Vodafone, where we have seen power consumption reduced by up to 50%.

“We also recently announced another that we developed with BT, which saw the use of our huge MIMO radio and saw the power reduced by 40%. We are working on how to break the energy curve with 5G. In other words, how do you get the benefits of 5G by having better latency without just increasing power? »

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New Brock Canada Research Chair improves health through technology – The Brock News https://cetril.org/new-brock-canada-research-chair-improves-health-through-technology-the-brock-news/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 21:51:16 +0000 https://cetril.org/new-brock-canada-research-chair-improves-health-through-technology-the-brock-news/ When computing meets biology, unknown details about human health are revealed. Yifeng Li is an expert in bioinformatics, an emerging field of study in which software tools and methods are used to reveal embedded patterns in large and complex biological datasets. “These models help us uncover the hidden information we need to create solutions that […]]]>

When computing meets biology, unknown details about human health are revealed.

Yifeng Li is an expert in bioinformatics, an emerging field of study in which software tools and methods are used to reveal embedded patterns in large and complex biological datasets.

“These models help us uncover the hidden information we need to create solutions that will solve diseases and other challenges in human biology,” says the University’s assistant professor of computer science and biological sciences. Brock.

Li’s research largely focuses on harnessing artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to develop or refine drugs to treat cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease, among other conditions. , and reduce the negative side effects of medications.

Li was recently named Canada Research Chair (CRC) in Machine Learning for Biomedical Data Science. The news of his appointment was also accompanied by the reappointment of Brock Associate Professor Julia Baird CRC on Human Dimensions of Water Resources and Water Resilience.

Li’s research is supported by a $139,302 grant from the Canada Foundation for Innovation John R. Evans Leaders Fund (JELF)which Li plans to use to create Brock’s Biomedical Data Science Lab.

The lab’s equipment will include a high-performance multi-GPU server and data storage server for large-scale biomedical data processing and analysis.

“The lab is expected to build research leadership and become a hub for data science innovation to connect and collaborate with regional innovators from the university, community, industry, and government,” Li says.

Using computer technology, Li and his team create algorithms that separate and group objects such as microscopic cells, DNA strands and proteins from raw medical images and other samples.

Computing technology can then dive deep into how these groups of objects interact with each other, producing information in efficient and timely ways beyond the reach of human effort, Li says.

“With biomedical images, for example, it would take too long for humans to segment cells from a large image,” Li says. segment them all by hand?”

He says the algorithms he and his team are developing “literally” teach “software to better understand the biological information in a data set, and then fulfill all of the required goals, with the goal of improving and streamlining drug design.” “.

In the case of drug development, the algorithms will help ensure that the drug reaches the area of ​​the body affected by the disease and will have the desired effect.

Li and his team will also design new algorithms to fill in the gaps in cases where there are too few images and other data for meaningful analysis.

The team, which includes 14 students, has a research partnership with the British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, the University of Ottawa and the National Research Council to design new cancer drugs.

Other projects include drug development to combat COVID and hair loss.

“As CRC, I hope through research to change our health, improve our community, and equip students not only with knowledge and skills, but also with guidance on how they can pursue their own research journey” , says Li.

“The federal government’s Canada Research Chairs program recognizes world-class researchers whose innovative work contributes to the betterment of Canadian society and beyond,” said Tim Kenyon, vice-president of research at the ‘Brock University.

“Dr. Li’s groundbreaking work will advance the ability of AI to support the health and well-being of all Canadians, while contributing significantly to the development of the field of bioinformatics.

In addition to Li’s new position, Baird’s CRC has been renewed for another five years.

The associate professor uses her chair to improve understanding of how to effectively manage water resources and support long-term water sustainability, using resilience as the focus for this work.

Baird and Li are among 10 CRCs at Brock University. The University has a total of 14 CRC stipends.

The Canada Research Chairs Program invests up to $311 million annually to attract and retain some of the world’s most accomplished and promising minds. Chairholders aim to achieve excellence in research in engineering and in the natural sciences, in the health sciences, in the humanities and in the social sciences.

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Viewpoints highlights future demand for research institutions https://cetril.org/viewpoints-highlights-future-demand-for-research-institutions/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 16:02:00 +0000 https://cetril.org/viewpoints-highlights-future-demand-for-research-institutions/ Muscat: Leading conversations on industry-relevant topics that positively impact the community, Sohar International recently wrapped up its 11th virtual edition of Viewpoints. Conceptualized and moderated by the President of Sohar International, Mr. Mohamed Mahfoodh Al Ardhi, the last session welcomed as a guest speaker the famous historian and author, Professor David Nirenberg. Director and Professor […]]]>

Muscat: Leading conversations on industry-relevant topics that positively impact the community, Sohar International recently wrapped up its 11th virtual edition of Viewpoints.

Conceptualized and moderated by the President of Sohar International, Mr. Mohamed Mahfoodh Al Ardhi, the last session welcomed as a guest speaker the famous historian and author, Professor David Nirenberg. Director and Professor Leon Levy at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, Nirenberg focused on “What kind of research and research institutions does the future demand?” where he highlighted the key aspects of research, the vital role of research institutions and how its needs and demands are constantly changing.

The virtual edition, which was broadcast live via Sohar International’s YouTube channel and Zoom platform, saw the active participation of university students, industry leaders, senior executives and professionals from different sectors of the society.

The session was broadcast live for students, faculty and management at the renowned Oman College of Banking and Financial Studies.

The CBFS audience participated with intrigue and curiosity by asking several relevant questions that could help them in their future careers.

Relevant, engaging and inspiring, the forum, designed in a format that stimulates interaction, gave participants the opportunity to engage in meaningful dialogues with the speaker.

Those who missed the live stream can now watch the full session on the bank’s official YouTube page.

Commenting on the session, Mohamed Mahfoodh Al Ardhi said, “Viewpoints of Sohar International is revered for its distinctive perspective on enhancing community interactions through thought-provoking discussions. As an organization, Sohar International has always been at the forefront of community initiatives that provide an impetus to improve the knowledge, skills and competencies of individuals while giving them the necessary exposure and familiarization with the dynamics of international markets.

Mohamed Al Ardhi added saying, “Viewpoints features speakers who have led transformation in their fields at the highest level. The ideas discussed by Professor David Nirenberg were therefore enlightening. He went beyond giving participants a renewed perspective on the critical role of research – he targeted a more fundamental level and underscored the need to always keep an open mind, to remain curious and to be receptive to change. Through initiatives like these, Sohar International will continue to persevere in developing a strong vision for the future of our nation, implementing concrete actions that deliver results, and identifying opportunities. for our young people to flourish.

A veteran in the field with an inherent passion for research and innovation, Professor David Nirenberg, in his keynote, explained how the world is experiencing massive datafication – where all aspects of human life become data, which is transferred to information and then realized as a new form of value.

He discussed the interesting aspect of using machine vision and signal processing to solve complex industrial tasks effectively and efficiently.

While talking about the evolution of the data revolution, Nirenberg focused on machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence (AI) and computer science that uses data and algorithms to emulate the human learning, gradually improving its accuracy over time; and the increased relevance of data-driven decision making and data interpretation today.

Viewpoints – Sohar’s International President’s Forum is strongly aligned with the bank’s broader goals of sparking curiosity in the minds of young people, empowering the community through knowledge-sharing platforms, and advocating for global best practices. As a bank that prioritizes innovation, Sohar International has always recognized the importance of research and development to keep pace with market needs.

The bank has also adopted various technological advancements to better serve the needs of the community. In the same vein, Viewpoints, which was initially organized as a series of physical events, adapted to changing demand and took the virtual route, where it continues its success story.

The platform hosted several international industry experts as guest speakers who not only shared invaluable insights but also gave attendees a fresh perspective on the world.

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The publication of research articles in journals is no longer mandatory to obtain a doctorate: UGC https://cetril.org/the-publication-of-research-articles-in-journals-is-no-longer-mandatory-to-obtain-a-doctorate-ugc/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 08:14:21 +0000 https://cetril.org/the-publication-of-research-articles-in-journals-is-no-longer-mandatory-to-obtain-a-doctorate-ugc/ The University Grants Commission (UGC) omitted the mandatory requirement to have research articles published in peer-reviewed journals before submitting a doctoral dissertation. Professor M Jagadesh Kumar, President of UGC, said that by eliminating the mandatory publication requirement, the higher education regulator has recognized that a “one size fits all” approach is not desirable, a- he […]]]>

The University Grants Commission (UGC) omitted the mandatory requirement to have research articles published in peer-reviewed journals before submitting a doctoral dissertation. Professor M Jagadesh Kumar, President of UGC, said that by eliminating the mandatory publication requirement, the higher education regulator has recognized that a “one size fits all” approach is not desirable, a- he told The Tribune.

MPhil Fellows were required to present at least one research paper at a conference or seminar. On the other hand, doctoral students had to present two research papers at conferences or seminars and publish at least one paper in a peer-reviewed journal before submitting their thesis. However, in the new doctoral program regulations made public on November 7, the commission has removed this requirement.

Read also | UGC insists universities and colleges implement EWS quota, HEIs say they haven’t received funds

Professor Kumar explained the need to avoid a unified approach to the assessment of all disciplines, pointing out that many computer science PhD students prefer to present their papers at conferences rather than publish them in journals.

Kumar, however, added that he does not believe doctoral students should completely stop publishing research papers in peer-reviewed journals. He urged universities to ensure that the PhD evaluation process is strengthened and that researchers are trained to publish in peer-reviewed journals and apply for patents where possible.

The UGC president said that students can pursue doctoral studies in subjects other than those in which they completed their postgraduate studies, but that universities must change their policies to allow this type of migration. “NEP 2020 encourages multidisciplinary education. Universities need to change their ordinances to facilitate such migration from one discipline to another,” he said.

Meanwhile, the commission also dropped its plan to involve universities and colleges to reserve a minimum of 60% of their annual intake of doctoral candidates for qualified NET or JRF students. The UGC proposed in the draft regulations published in March that qualified NET/JRF students occupy 60% of the total number of vacant seats in an institute of higher learning during an academic year.

Read all Latest education news here

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NATIONAL RESEARCH CORP Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (Form 10-Q) https://cetril.org/national-research-corp-managements-discussion-and-analysis-of-financial-condition-and-results-of-operations-form-10-q/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 13:38:05 +0000 https://cetril.org/national-research-corp-managements-discussion-and-analysis-of-financial-condition-and-results-of-operations-form-10-q/ The following discussion of our results of operations and financial conditions should be read in conjunction with our condensed consolidated financial statements and related notes appearing elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Our purpose is to enable human understanding. We believe that understanding the story is the key to unlocking the highest-quality and […]]]>
The following discussion of our results of operations and financial conditions
should be read in conjunction with our condensed consolidated financial
statements and related notes appearing elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on
Form 10-Q.



Our purpose is to enable human understanding. We believe that understanding the
story is the key to unlocking the highest-quality and truly personalized care.
We are a leading provider of analytics and insights that facilitate measurement
and improvement of patient engagement and customer loyalty for healthcare
organizations. Our heritage, proprietary methods, and holistic approach enable
our partners to better understand the people they care for and design
experiences that inspire loyalty and trust, while also facilitating regulatory
compliance and the shift to population-based health management. Our end-to-end
solutions enable our clients to understand what matters most to each person they
serve - before, during, after, and outside of clinical encounters - to gain a
longitudinal understanding of how life and health intersect, with the goal of
developing lasting, trusting relationships. Our ability to measure what matters
most and systematically capture, analyze and deliver insights based on
self-reported information from patients, families and consumers is critical in
today's healthcare market. We believe that access to and analysis of our
extensive consumer-driven information is becoming more valuable as healthcare
providers increasingly need to more deeply understand and engage the people they
serve to build customer loyalty.



Our portfolio of subscription-based solutions provides actionable information
and analysis to healthcare organizations across a range of mission-critical,
constituent-related elements, including patient experience, service recovery,
care transitions, health risk assessments, employee engagement, reputation
management, and brand loyalty. We partner with clients across the continuum of
healthcare services. We believe this cross-continuum positioning is a unique and
an increasingly important capability as evolving payment models drive healthcare
providers and payers towards a more collaborative and integrated service model.



The outbreak of COVID-19, and the associated responses, have impacted our
business in a variety of ways. Governments have implemented business and travel
restrictions and recommended social distancing and other guidelines. Many
businesses, including many of our clients, have de-emphasized external business
opportunities and restricted in-person meetings while shifting their attention
toward addressing COVID-19 planning, business disruptions, higher costs, and
revenue shortfalls. At NRC, the vast majority of our associates are working
remotely, and to date we have been capable of providing our services without
significant disruption. We made our facilities available for associates to
return to work effective July 1, 2021 at their discretion. The duration and
severity of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated impacts on our business,
including the impact on our revenue, expenses, and cash flows, cannot be
predicted at this time. Like many other companies, we have experienced higher
attrition and higher costs to attract, train and retain these associates.
Attrition in our sales and service areas can also impact our ability to retain
and attract new business. Based on the foregoing, we do not expect our recent
revenue and earnings growth to be indicative of future expectations. We do,
however, expect to have adequate sources of liquidity to meet our current and
expected needs for the foreseeable future.



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  Table of Contents



Results of Operations



The following tables set forth, for the periods indicated, selected financial
information derived from our consolidated financial statements and the
percentage change in such items versus the prior comparable period, as well as
other key financial metrics. The discussion that follows the information should
be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements.



Three Months Ended September 30, 2022, Compared to Three Months Ended September
30, 2021





                                                                                               Percentage
                                                (In thousands, except percentages)              Increase
                                                 Three Months Ended September 30,              (Decrease)
                                                  2022                      2021             2022 over 2021
Revenue                                     $          37,691         $          37,767                 (0.2 )
Direct expenses                                        14,524                    13,707                  6.0
Selling, general, and administrative                   10,762                     9,523                 13.0
Depreciation, amortization and impairment               1,296                     1,399                 (7.4 )
Operating income                                       11,109                    13,138                (15.4 )
Total other income (expense)                             (262 )                    (514 )              (49.0 )
Provision for income taxes                              2,549                     2,967                (14.1 )
Effective Tax Rate                                       23.5 %                    23.5 %                  -

Operating margin                                         29.5 %                    34.8 %              (15.2 )








Revenue. Revenue in the 2022 period decreased compared to the 2021 period
primarily due to the elimination of Canadian revenue of $660,000 due to the
scheduled closure of the Canadian office in the 2022 period. Revenue in the US
increased by $584,000 consisting of growth in recurring revenue in our existing
client base of $2.9 million and non-recurring revenues of $103,000. This was
partially offset by a decrease in US recurring revenue from new customer sales
of $2.4 million.  We do not expect Canadian revenues in the future due to the
closure of the Canadian office.



Direct expenses. Variable expenses decreased $8,000 in the 2022 period compared
to the 2021 period primarily from lower survey and other subscription services
of $324,000 due to lower volumes partially offset by increased conference
expenses of $296,000 due to higher room rental and audio-visual costs. Variable
expenses as a percentage of revenue were 15.3% in the 2022 and 2021 periods.
Fixed expenses increased $825,000 primarily as a result of increased salary and
benefit costs to attract and retain associates of $674,000 and contracted
services to support our clients and invest in workforce automation of $277,000.



Selling, general and administrative expenses. Selling, general and administrative expenses increased in the 2022 period compared to the 2021 period, mainly due to the new marketing initiatives of $1.0 million to expand brand awareness and support sales development.

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Depreciation, amortization and impairment. Depreciation, amortization and
impairment expenses decreased in the 2022 period compared to the 2021 period
primarily due to certain software development and intangible assets being fully
amortized after the 2021 period.



Operating income and margin. Operating income and margin decreased in the 2022
period compared to the 2021 period due to growth in salary and benefit costs to
attract and retain associates including a new benefit addition, as well as
additional investments in our workforce automation tools and new marketing
initiatives.



Total other income (expense). Total other income (expense) decreased in the 2022
period compared to the 2021 period primarily due to lower interest expense from
the declining balance on our term loan of $125,000 and a reduction in
intercompany revaluation adjustments from changes in the Canadian to U.S. dollar
foreign exchange rate of $84,000 due to closure of the Canadian office.



Provision for income taxes and effective tax rate. Provision for income taxes
decreased in the 2022 period compared to the 2021 period primarily due to
decreased taxable income as the effective tax rate remained consistent between
periods.





Nine Months Ended September 30, 2022, Compared to Nine Months Ended September
30, 2021



                                                                                             Percentage
                                               (In thousands, except percentages)             Increase
                                                 Nine Months Ended September 30,             (Decrease)
                                                  2022                    2021             2022 over 2021
Revenue                                     $         113,424       $         109,656                  3.4
Direct expenses                                        43,062                  38,184                 12.8
Selling, general, and administrative                   32,159                  29,060                 10.7
Depreciation, amortization and impairment               3,902                   5,016                (22.2 )
Operating income                                       34,301                  37,396                 (8.3 )
Total other income (expense)                             (958 )                (1,266 )              (24.3 )
Provision for income taxes                              8,184                   8,297                 (1.4 )
Effective Tax Rate                                       24.5 %                  23.0 %                6.5

Operating margin                                         30.2 %                  34.1 %              (11.4 )
Recurring Contact Value                     $         148,036       $         151,525                 (2.3 )
Cash provided by operating activities                  28,161                  34,270                (17.8 )






Revenue. Revenue in the 2022 period increased compared to the 2021 period due to
an increase in US revenue of $5.3 million partially offset by decreased Canadian
revenue of $1.5 million due to the scheduled closure of the Canadian office in
the 2022 period. US revenue increased due to growth in recurring revenue in our
existing client base of $11.5 million partially offset by decreases in US
recurring revenue from new customer sales of $5.9 million and non-recurring
revenues of $246,000.  We do not expect Canadian revenues in the future due to
the closure of the Canadian office.



Direct expenses. Variable expenses increased $525,000 in the 2022 period
compared to the 2021 period due to growth in conference expenses of $1.4 million
due to additional conferences being held in the 2022 period compared to the 2021
period and the shift to allow live or virtual attendance at conferences
partially offset by lower survey and other subscription services of $906,000.
Variable expenses as a percentage of revenue were 14.4% in the 2022 and 2021
periods. Fixed expenses increased $4.4 million primarily as a result of
increased salary and benefit costs to attract and retain associates of $3.4
million, contracted services to support our clients and invest in workforce
automation of $656,000 and increased travel costs of $326,000 due to COVID
travel restrictions being lifted.



Selling, general and administrative expenses. Selling, general and
administrative expenses increased in the 2022 period compared to the 2021 period
primarily due to innovation investments to support further development of our
Human Understanding Solutions of $1.3 million, new marketing initiatives of $1.4
million, increased travel costs of $500,000 due to COVID travel restrictions
being lifted, new associate coaching benefit expense of $372,000, as well as
increased business insurance costs of $303,000, partially offset by decreases in
public company and other legal and accounting costs of $969,000.



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Depreciation, amortization and impairment. Depreciation, amortization and
impairment expenses decreased in the 2022 period compared to the 2021 period
primarily due to additional depreciation expense in 2021 from shortening the
estimated useful lives of certain building assets of $403,000, incurring an ROU
asset impairment of $324,000 from subleasing a remote office location in 2021
and a decrease of $392,000 due to certain software development and intangible
assets being fully amortized after the 2021 period.



Operating income and margin. Operating income and margin decreased in the 2022
period compared to the 2021 period due to growth in salary and benefit costs to
attract and retain associates including a new associate benefit, as well as
additional investments in our Human Understanding Solutions, workforce
automation tools and marketing initiatives.



Total other income (expense). Total other income (expense) decreased in the 2022
period compared to the 2021 period primarily due to lower interest expense from
the declining balance on our term loan of $345,000.



Provision for income taxes and effective tax rate. Provision for income taxes
decreased in the 2022 period compared to the 2021 period primarily due to
decreased taxable income. The effective tax rate increased in the 2022 period
compared to the 2021 period mainly due to decreased tax benefits from the
exercise and vesting of share-based compensation awards of $316,000 and a 0.6%
increase in our state tax rate which fluctuates based on the various
apportionment factors and rates for the states we operate in.



Recurring Contact Value. Recurring contract value declined in the 2022 period
compared to the 2021 period in part due to our strategy to focus on growing our
digital core solutions, resulting in the elimination of certain legacy
offerings. Our core digital solutions had 2.2% positive recurring contract value
growth at September 30, 2022 compared to September 30, 2021. In addition, sales
declined due to the difficulties of selling to our clients during the COVID-19
pandemic as well as increased turnover within our sales force. Our recurring
contract value metric represents the total revenue projected under all renewable
contracts for their respective next annual renewal periods, assuming no upsells,
downsells, price increases, or cancellations, measured as of the most recent
quarter end.



Cash provided by operating activities. Cash provided by operating activities
decreased mainly due changes in deferred revenue primarily due to timing of
initial billings on new and renewal contracts, changes in income taxes
receivable and payable due to the timing of income tax payments and decreased
net income net of non-cash items. See the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
included in this report for the detail of our operating cash flows.





Cash and capital resources




Our Board of Directors has established priorities for capital allocation, which
prioritize funding of innovation and growth investments, including merger and
acquisition activity as well as internal projects. The secondary priority is
capital allocation for quarterly dividends and share repurchases. We believe
that our existing sources of liquidity, including cash and cash equivalents,
borrowing availability, and operating cash flows will be sufficient to meet our
projected capital and debt maturity needs for the foreseeable future.



As of September 30, 2022, our principal sources of liquidity included $28.4
million of cash and cash equivalents, up to $30 million of unused borrowings
under our line of credit and up to $75 million on our delayed draw term note. Of
this cash, $2.7 million was held in Canada. The delayed draw term note can only
be used to fund permitted future business acquisitions or repurchasing our
Common Stock.



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Our cash flows from operating activities consist of net income adjusted for
non-cash items including depreciation and amortization, deferred income taxes,
share-based compensation and related taxes, reserve for uncertain tax positions,
loss on disposal of property and equipment and the effect of working capital
changes. Cash provided by operating activities decreased mainly due changes in
deferred revenue, changes in income taxes receivable and payable and decreased
net income net of non-cash items. These were partially offset by changes in
trade accounts receivable which fluctuate with the timing of billing and
collections and deferred contract costs due to a reduction in deferral of these
costs which increased cash flow from operating activities.



We had a working capital surplus of $8.0 million and $33.3 million on September
30, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively. The change was primarily due to
decreases in cash and cash equivalents and increases in dividends payable,
partially offset by increases in trade accounts receivable and decreases in
accrued wages and bonuses and accrued expenses. Cash and cash equivalents
decreased mainly due to repurchase of shares of our Common Stock for treasury.
Dividends payable increased due to timing of declarations and payments of
dividends. Trade accounts receivable increased due to timing of billing and
collections. Accrued wages and bonuses decreased due to timing and growth of the
year-end bonus. Accrued expenses decreased mainly due to payment of the deferred
acquisition consideration. Our working capital is significantly impacted by our
large deferred revenue balances which will vary based on the timing and
frequency of billings on annual agreements.



Cash used in investing activities consisted of purchases of property, plant and equipment, including computer software and hardware, building improvements, and furniture and equipment.




Cash used in financing activities consisted of payments for borrowings under the
term note and finance lease obligations. We also used cash to pay the deferred
acquisition consideration, repurchase shares of our Common Stock for treasury,
to pay dividends on Common Stock and to pay employee payroll tax withholdings on
share-based awards exercised.



Our significant cash requirements include the following contractual and other obligations:



Dividends



Cash dividends of $15.0 million were paid in the nine months ended September 30,
2022. Dividends of $5.9 million were declared in the three months ended
September 30, 2022 and paid in October 2022. The dividends were paid from cash
on hand. Our board of directors considers whether to declare a dividend and the
amount of any dividends declared on a quarterly basis.



Acquisition Consideration



On January 4, 2021, we acquired substantially all assets and assumed certain
liabilities of PatientWisdom, Inc., a company with a health engagement solution
that will further our purpose of operationalizing human understanding through
tangible and actionable insights. $3.0 million of the total $5.0 million
all-cash consideration was paid at closing. We paid the remaining $2.0 million
in January 2022. All payments were made with cash on hand.



Capital Expenditures



We paid cash of $7.9 million for capital expenditures in the nine months ended
September 30, 2022. These expenditures consisted mainly of computer software
development for our Human Understanding solutions and building renovations to
our headquarters of $2.5 million and $3.5 million, respectively. We estimate
future costs related to our headquarters building renovations to be $3.1 million
and $16.4 million in 2022 and 2023, respectively, which we expect to fund
through operating cash flows.



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Debt



Our amended and restated credit agreement (the "Credit Agreement") with First
National Bank of Omaha ("FNB") was amended and restated on September 30, 2022
and includes (i) a $30,000,000 revolving credit facility (the "Line of Credit"),
(ii) a $23,412,383 term loan (the "Term Loan") and (iii) a $75,000,000 delayed
draw-down term facility (the "Delayed Draw Term Loan" and, together with the
Line of Credit and the Term Loan, the "Credit Facilities"). We may use the
Delayed Draw Term Loan to fund any permitted future business acquisitions or
repurchases of our Common Stock and the Line of Credit to fund ongoing working
capital needs and for other general corporate purposes.



The term loan has an outstanding balance of $23.4 million and is payable in monthly installments of $462,988 through May 2027. The term loan bears interest at a fixed annual rate of 5%.




Borrowings under the Line of Credit and the Delayed Draw Term Loan, if any, bear
interest at a floating rate equal to the 30-day Secured Overnight Financing Rate
("SOFR") plus 235 basis points (4.53% at September 30, 2022). Interest on the
Line of Credit accrues and is payable monthly. Principal amounts outstanding
under the Line of Credit are due and payable in full at maturity, in May 2025.
As of September 30, 2022, the Line of Credit did not have a balance. There were
no borrowings on the Line of Credit during the nine-month periods ended
September 30, 2022 or 2021. There have been no borrowings on the Delayed Draw
Term Loan since origination.


We are required to pay outstanding unused commitment fees each quarter in arrears pursuant to the Line of Credit and Deferred Drawn Term Loan Facility at a rate of 0.20% per annum based on daily portions actual unused amounts of the line of credit and the deferred draw term loan. Loan facility, respectively.




The Credit Agreement contains customary representations, warranties, affirmative
and negative covenants (including financial covenants) and events of default.
The negative covenants include, among other things, restrictions regarding the
incurrence of indebtedness and liens, repurchases of our Common Stock and
acquisitions, subject in each case to certain exceptions. Pursuant to the Credit
Agreement, we are required to maintain a minimum fixed charge coverage ratio of
1.10x for all testing periods throughout the term(s) of the Credit Facilities,
which calculation excludes, unless our liquidity falls below a specified
threshold, (i) any cash dividend in a fiscal quarter that, together with all
other cash dividends paid or declared during such fiscal quarter, exceeds
$5,500,000 in total cash dividends paid or declared, (ii) the portion of the
purchase price for any permitted share repurchase of our shares paid with cash
on hand, and (iii) the portion of any acquisition consideration for a permitted
acquisition paid with cash on hand. We are also required to maintain a cash flow
leverage ratio of 3.00x or less for all testing periods throughout the term(s)
of the Credit Facilities. All obligations under the Credit Facilities are to be
guaranteed by each of our wholly owned domestic subsidiaries, if any, and, to
the extent required by the Credit Agreement, direct and indirect wholly owned
foreign subsidiaries. As of September 30, 2022, we were in compliance with our
financial covenants.



The Credit Facilities are secured, subject to permitted liens and other agreed
upon exceptions, by a first-priority lien on and perfected security interest in
substantially all of our and our guarantors' present and future assets
(including, without limitation, fee-owned real property, and limited, in the
case of the equity interests of foreign subsidiaries, to 65% of the outstanding
equity interests of such subsidiaries).



Leases



We have lease arrangements for certain computer, office, printing and inserting
equipment as well as office and data center space. As of September 30, 2022, we
had fixed lease payments of $581,000 and $420,000 for operating and finance
leases, respectively payable within 12 months.



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Taxes



The liability for gross unrecognized tax benefits related to uncertain tax
positions was $1.4 million as of September 30, 2022. See Note 4, "Income Taxes",
to the Consolidated Financial Statements contained in this report for income tax
related information.



As of September 30, 2022, the balance of the deemed repatriation tax payable
imposed by the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the Act") was $164,000, which
we expect to pay by the end of 2022.



Share buyback programs




On May 19, 2022 our Board of Directors approved a new stock repurchase
authorization of 2,500,000 shares of Common Stock (the "2022 Program"). Under
the 2022 Program we are authorized to repurchase from time-to-time shares of our
outstanding Common Stock on the open market or in privately negotiated
transactions. The timing and amount of stock repurchases will depend on a
variety of factors, including market conditions as well as corporate and
regulatory considerations. The 2022 Program may be suspended, modified, or
discontinued at any time and we have no obligation to repurchase any amount of
Common Stock in connection with the 2022 Program. The 2022 Program has no set
expiration date.



During the three months ended September 30, 2022, we repurchased 87,135 shares
of our Common Stock under the 2022 Program for an aggregate of $3.1 million. As
of September 30, 2022, the remaining number of shares of Common Stock that could
be purchased under the 2022 Program was 1,987,517 shares.



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Contents

Critical accounting estimates

There have been no changes to our critical accounting estimates described in the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021 that materially affect our condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes.

© Edgar Online, source Previews

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Research Advisor | ReliefWeb https://cetril.org/research-advisor-reliefweb/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 17:51:20 +0000 https://cetril.org/research-advisor-reliefweb/ Context of the project Over more than 11 years of conflict, the Syrian conflict has seen human rights violations on a dramatic scale, with hundreds of thousands dead and millions displaced. The damage has also systematically targeted civilians, including media, civil society and medical personnel, and the places where they work. While the conflict is […]]]>

Context of the project

Over more than 11 years of conflict, the Syrian conflict has seen human rights violations on a dramatic scale, with hundreds of thousands dead and millions displaced. The damage has also systematically targeted civilians, including media, civil society and medical personnel, and the places where they work.

While the conflict is far from over, civil society organizations face many obstacles in bringing justice to victims and holding perpetrators accountable, especially given the lack of effective governance and rule of law. . These barriers include:

  • Lack of systematic data collection – in particular: 1) attacks on health facilities; 2) medical and legal documentation of complex cases of human rights violations;
  • Limited coordination between health sector and human rights partners, legal experts, media related to channeling data for justice and accountability efforts;
  • Limited access to specialist services among at-risk populations – particularly victims of torture, arbitrary detention, forced displacement and victims of attacks on health facilities
  • Lack of psychosocial support for frontline workers caring for victims of human rights violations

The Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS) Foundation advancing justice and accountability for Syrians by pursuing three objectives:

  1. Improve the quality of documentation and the preservation of evidence related to human rights violations
  2. Strengthen the participation of Syrian civil society – particularly the health sector – in international and national justice and accountability mechanisms.
  3. Increase access to comprehensive support services for victims of human rights violations.

Objective and scope of work

Under the supervision of the SAMS Senior Program Manager, and in close collaboration with the Advocacy Department and the Protection Department, the Research Consultant will work on the following:

Activity 01: Data analysis, including identifying patterns in previously collected data

Throughout this project, SAMS cleaned and organized its own data related to attacks on health workers.

Once the data cleaning is complete, the archive will be shared with the data analysis consultant. The analysis should ultimately be captured through data visualization tools (graphs, infographics, tables, etc.) and provide insight into trends regarding both attacks and their impacts on victims and communities. .

Activity 02: Supervise and conduct interviews with relatives-friends or colleagues of victims

The research consultant should also engage in direct interviews with family and friends of those killed in health attacks.

Interviews should be conducted in Arabic and then transcribed for qualitative analysis. Quotations may be used in the final report. The estimated number of interviews will be between 10 and 20. These interviews may also be presented online pending the agreement of the persons concerned.

Activity 03: Write a detailed report using evidence collected on attacks on health workers and interviews.

The analysis and previous interviews will serve as the basis for a final report. Such a report should include a review of the attacks on health workers in Syria, as well as previous efforts that have been made to achieve accountability. The report should also highlight the evidence and analysis that SAMS was able to provide due to the attacks on its own facilities. The report will be an important document in SAMS’ ongoing advocacy efforts to provide support to victims of attacks and hold perpetrators accountable.

Activity 04: Support the linking of information between the written report and the memory page

After finalizing the draft report, the web designer will develop the memorial page on the SAMS website. The consultant should advise on how best to reflect the necessary information on the webpage based on the content of the draft report.

Surveillance

The Research Consultant will work under the guidance of the SAMS Senior Program Manager and in coordination with the SAMS Advocacy Department.

Authority

The Research Consultant will have no authority to make any financial or executive commitments on behalf of SAMS.

Qualifications

  • Advanced university degree in journalism, public health or related field;
  • Proven ability to produce reports and analysis
  • Excellent knowledge of the context of protection of humanitarian workers and the conflict in Syria.
  • At least 4 years of experience in the fields mentioned above;
  • As all products will be produced in English, professional fluency in English and Arabic, both spoken and written; are required
  • Computer literate with hands-on experience with Microsoft packages;
  • Ability and willingness to work with people from different cultural backgrounds of the Syrian social fabric;
  • Demonstrated gender awareness and sensitivity, as well as the ability to integrate a gender perspective into tasks and activities.

Selection process

The search consultant will be identified and selected by SAMS, and the selected candidate will be subject to a background check.

Deliverables:

  • A detailed report on SAMS healthcare personnel who lost their lives while providing medical care in Syria. In addition to analyzing the incidents of healthcare worker deaths documented in the SAMS archives, the written report will provide the content of the memorial page for all staff killed which will also be included in the printed report.

Timing and Level of Effort:

The selected candidate will bring their expertise and services to the project as a consultant in different phases of the project, with a total of 30 working days.

The consultant is expected to start the second week of November and deliver the final document, concluding all activities and consultation, by December 28, 2022.

Distribution of main tasks and time:

Activity 1: Data analysis

Estimated time: 5 days

Key result: Provide quantitative analysis of attacks on health workers to use this information for accountability efforts

Activity 2: Supervise and conduct interviews with relatives, friends or colleagues of the victims

Estimated time: 5 days

key output: Provide media content and qualitative content for the written and web product

Activity 3: Direct, write and design

Estimated time:15 days

key output: Documents that provide a detailed examination of attacks on health workers in Syria and in particular document personnel killed by SAMS

Activity 4: Supervise the linking of information between the written report and the memory page

Estimated time: 5 days

Key result: Have a designed copy of the report on the SAMS website

Total 30 days

How to register

Please send your resume, cost proposal, and writing sample to careers@sams-usa.net

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Starlink supports NVIDIA’s GeForce Now, YouTube and Netflix, according to research paper https://cetril.org/starlink-supports-nvidias-geforce-now-youtube-and-netflix-according-to-research-paper/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 12:45:00 +0000 https://cetril.org/starlink-supports-nvidias-geforce-now-youtube-and-netflix-according-to-research-paper/ This is not investment advice. The author has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. Wccftech.com has a disclosure and ethics policy. SpaceX’s Starlink satellite internet service meets the latency standards required by NVIDIA’s GeForce Now cloud gaming service, according to a new study published by Belgian and Italian researchers. Researchers tested several Starlink […]]]>

This is not investment advice. The author has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. Wccftech.com has a disclosure and ethics policy.

SpaceX’s Starlink satellite internet service meets the latency standards required by NVIDIA’s GeForce Now cloud gaming service, according to a new study published by Belgian and Italian researchers. Researchers tested several Starlink performance metrics that are crucial to day-to-day performance, looking at service latency, data transfer rates, and web browsing performance. Their results demonstrated that for Belgium and Europe, Starlink significantly outperforms geostationary satellite Internet services, meets the latency marketed by SpaceX, and equals the performance of traditional wired broadband Internet.

Starlink’s median latency ranges between 46 milliseconds and 52 milliseconds, research reveals

The study saw the researchers set up three similar computers connected to the Internet and their own servers. One of them used Starlink and the other an unnamed geostationary satellite internet service in Europe to connect to the internet. The last used an ethernet adapter to connect to the UCLouvain network.

Using these, they tested round-trip time (RTT or latency), information lost with and without heavy network load, network throughput (the amount of data transferred in a unit of time, or Mbps ) and the experience a standard user might receive while browsing web pages measured by the time it takes to fully load a web page and the time it takes for a web page to display.

Latency, or the time it takes for information to travel to and from the user’s computer, is crucial for several different applications such as video conferencing and online gaming. The team tested three scenarios: the first was the base case with no network load, the second with a 100MB load, and the third with a load more comparable to real-time video traffic.

STARLINK-LATENCY-SEARCH-PAPER-2

Lowest latency sits at 20 milliseconds View five-month tests

These revealed that in the first scenario, Starlink’s median latency ranged between 46 milliseconds and 52 milliseconds and the lowest reading was 20.5 milliseconds. For the remaining two tests, the one with a 100MB load showed the median to be 95 milliseconds and for the last test the median value was 50 milliseconds.

Additionally, the minimum latencies were observed for German and Dutch servers, with those in Singapore and San Francisco giving readings of 184 milliseconds and 270 milliseconds, respectively, and without any additional load testing. This is natural since these last two servers are located at a considerable distance from the test computers. The researchers also traced the data path to these two locations and determined that they were the same, implying that the laser satellites have not been activated to date – at least in Europe.

A five-month latency test also showed that overall readings dropped from February, potentially as more satellites came online and also jumped between April and May – indicating that a network-wide change could have taken place. SpaceX has started providing Ukraine with Starlink coverage also in March, and since then the company has had to ward off repeated cyberattacks against service.

Summarizing the latency tests, the researchers conclude that their readings are below the maximum latency of 80 milliseconds required by NVIDIA’s GeForce Now gaming service.

Cumulative density function (CDF) for Starlink throughput via Ookla and QUIC is the fastest compared to other satellite internet service. The CDF displays the sum of the values ​​as a percentage of the total readings, with the flow rate on the Y axis (bottom) and the percentage of readings on the X axis (vertical). Image: Figure 5 – François Michel, Martino Trevisan, Danilo Giordano and Olivier Bonaventure. 2022. A first look at Starlink’s performance. In Proceedings of the 22nd ACM Internet Measurement Conference (IMC ’22), October 25-27, 2022, Nice, France. ACM, New York, NY, USA, 7 pages. https://doi.org/10.1145/3517745. 3561416

Starlink does not limit Netflix, Disney+, YouTube or other streaming apps

Moving to throughput, the researchers tested speed through the popular Ookla internet speed test platform and via the 100 MB QUIC test with its server located on the UCLouvain campus. Testing with QUIC allows for better performance measurement because it does not allow the Internet to use performance-enhancing proxies.

Ookla speed tests had a median download speed of 178 Mbps and the highest read of 386 Mbps. Dispelling some of the common beliefs that download speed varies with time of day, the team was unable to determine a pattern based on whether the three-month tests were run daytime or daytime. night. The 100MB test showed lower readings, which the researchers believe could be due to the fact that it uses only one server compared to the four servers used by Ookla.

Web page loading and indexing speeds for Starlink, a geostationary satellite service and wired Internet. Image: Figure 6 – François Michel, Martino Trevisan, Danilo Giordano and Olivier Bonaventure. 2022. A first look at Starlink’s performance. In Proceedings of the 22nd ACM Internet Measurement Conference (IMC ’22), October 25-27, 2022, Nice, France. ACM, New York, NY, USA, 7 pages. https://doi.org/10.1145/3517745. 3561416

Finally, daily web browsing tests for Starlink show that it works better online with wired internet than with the other satellite internet which uses satellites orbiting at a higher altitude.

Starlink also does not discriminate against or limit traffic from a host of popular video streaming services such as Netflix and YouTube. The researchers tested 22 different services and could not uncover any attempts to throttle bandwidth, and they also confirmed that no performance-enhancing proxies are used to mitigate high latency issues.

Concluding their study, the team warns that they did not thoroughly analyze web browsing quality and only loaded homepages instead of others. Other factors such as different browsers and quality of service during video calls have also not been tested. They also pointed out that packet loss (which often leads to a drop in voice or stream during a videoconference for example) is present in the network and occurs even when the network is not heavily used.

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Research finds Tonga eruption spawned massive phytoplankton bloom: Big Island Now https://cetril.org/research-finds-tonga-eruption-spawned-massive-phytoplankton-bloom-big-island-now/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://cetril.org/research-finds-tonga-eruption-spawned-massive-phytoplankton-bloom-big-island-now/ Ocean chlorophyll maps from before (left) and after (right) the January Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai eruption in the Kingdom of Tonga. (Barone, et al., 2022) Flowery, baby, flowery. A new study by a team of scientists from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa and Oregon State University revealed that the largest underwater volcanic eruption of the […]]]>
Ocean chlorophyll maps from before (left) and after (right) the January Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai eruption in the Kingdom of Tonga. (Barone, et al., 2022)

Flowery, baby, flowery.

A new study by a team of scientists from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa and Oregon State University revealed that the largest underwater volcanic eruption of the century led to a spectacular bloom of microscopic marine life that covered an area nearly 40 times the size of Oʻahu.

The burst of phytoplankton growth north of the island of Tongatapu in the Kingdom of Tonga occurred within 48 hours of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Haʻapai eruption. Phytoplankton are tiny photosynthetic organisms that produce oxygen and serve as the basis of the marine food web. The growth of these microbes can increase rapidly when nutrients become available.

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“Even though the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai eruption was underwater, a large ash plume reached a height of tens of kilometers into the atmosphere,” Benedetto Barone, lead study author and research oceanographer to Center for Microbial Oceanography: research and teaching at UH-Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, said in a press release. “The ashfall provided nutrients that stimulated the growth of phytoplankton, which reached concentrations well beyond typical values ​​seen in the region.

Hunga Tonga-Hunga Haʻapai eruption seen from the GOES satellite. Credit: NASA/NOAA

Three of the study authors previously assessed and sampled a smaller phytoplankton bloom linked to the 2018 Kīlauea eruption on the Big Island.

“It was quite simple to modify the computer code I had written to analyze satellite measurements around Hawaii to determine the impact of the Tonga eruption on the nearby ocean ecosystem,” Barone said in the statement. Press. “From the first moment we saw the results of the analysis, it was clear that there had been a rapid phytoplankton response in a large area.”

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The research team was led by the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology. He analyzed satellite images, radiation emission and light reflection from the sea surface and determined that the deposition of volcanic ash after the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai eruption was probably the most important source. important amount of nutrients responsible for the massive growth of phytoplankton.

“We were impressed to observe the vast region with elevated chlorophyll concentrations in such a short time after the eruption,” said Dave Karl, study co-author and director of the Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education. “It shows how quickly the ecosystem can respond to nutrient fertilization.”

The eruption was a natural fertilization event that revealed the ability of phytoplankton to react quickly – when the right conditions present themselves.

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“A casual observer could see seemingly very different parts of the environment – in this case, a volcano producing a large eruption and a major shift in the ecology of nearby oceans,” said Ken Rubin, co-author of the report. ‘study and volcanologist at the School of Ocean and Land Sciences and Technologies Department of Earth Sciences. said in the press release. “However, our observations illustrate the broad interconnection and interdependence of different aspects of the environment, perhaps even indicating an underappreciated link between volcanism and shallow marine ecosystems on a global scale.”

Phytoplankton extract carbon dioxide, responsible for global warming, from the atmosphere. Barone said the dynamics of the huge phytoplankton bloom after the Tonga eruption can help predict the behavior of pelagic environments, when nutrients are added to nutrient-poor regions of the ocean.

“This knowledge may prove useful in the discussion of the impacts of carbon dioxide removal technologies based on ocean fertilization,” Barone said.

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Ohio State launches CAFE program for semiconductor research, in collaboration with Intel and other Ohio universities https://cetril.org/ohio-state-launches-cafe-program-for-semiconductor-research-in-collaboration-with-intel-and-other-ohio-universities/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 01:45:28 +0000 https://cetril.org/ohio-state-launches-cafe-program-for-semiconductor-research-in-collaboration-with-intel-and-other-ohio-universities/ Yessica Jiminez participates in materials engineering research at the materials institute facilities as an undergraduate student. Courtesy of Mike Huson Amid the construction of two new Intel computer chip factories in Ohio, the Ohio State Institute for Materials Research is developing CAFE – the Center for Advanced Semiconductor Fabrication Research and Education – as a […]]]>

Yessica Jiminez participates in materials engineering research at the materials institute facilities as an undergraduate student. Courtesy of Mike Huson

Amid the construction of two new Intel computer chip factories in Ohio, the Ohio State Institute for Materials Research is developing CAFE – the Center for Advanced Semiconductor Fabrication Research and Education – as a multi- institutional for the advancement of research in the manufacture of semiconductors.

According to a September 9 Press releasethe center will provide an experience for graduate and undergraduate students by creating a “sustainable, highly skilled and diverse semiconductor manufacturing workforce” and paving the way to cutting-edge device technology through research .

According to Semiconductor Industry Associationsemiconductors are microchips that are “the brains of modern electronics”, helping to power smartphones, televisions, computers, medical equipment and more.

IMR Office of Research Vice President and Chief Innovation Officer Jay Sayre said negotiations between Intel and the university took place between three-person teams from each institute.

“Intel is a very integrated ecosystem, and the interests of Intel and the interests and capabilities of the university align,” Sayre said.

Intel pledged $3 million over three years to fund CAFE, according to the Press release.

IMR communications coordinator Mike Huson said Intel’s two new computer chip factories will provide new internship opportunities for Ohio State students. As new facilities start up, students will have the opportunity to apply for these opportunities and work in Intel’s manufacturing labs.

“In my mind, if I’m a student and interested in Intel, that’s an immediate route for me to be involved with CAFE,” Huson said. “It would give me the opportunity to work in this lab whether or not I have a bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral degree. Regardless, they have needs for all that.

Sayre said opportunities for students beyond paid internships include graduate research internships and undergraduate research experiences at Intel facilities in Ohio, Oregon and Arizona. Internships are available at all three institutions. The positions are open to all university students and will allow graduate and undergraduate students to collaborate on their research, he said.

Sayre said students will gain an understanding of the tech industry to inform their lab work.

“Students have the opportunity to understand how this research might be implemented and to come back and actually do this research in a lab with this kind of industry-informed perspective, Sayre said.

Sayre said the CAFE program will integrate Ohio State research with nine other Ohio public universities, led by Ohio State in close collaboration with the University of Cincinnati and the University from Ohio. The CAFE program will provide opportunities and funding to Central State and Wilberforce universities.

Sayre said this collaboration between universities is important to continuously evolve the tech industry.

“This type of communication exchange will be essential to ensure that we are always relevant, always evolving, always on the cutting edge of technology as we move forward,” Sayre said.

Sayre said CAFE also extends to Ohio’s existing 5-OSU Summer Undergraduate Research Experience Program — which allows students from Denison University, Kenyon College, Oberlin College , Ohio Wesleyan University and the College of Wooster to visit and work in the Ohio State Laboratories.

Sayre said Ohio State professors who have worked for Intel or in the semiconductor industry will guide the training of CAFE students; they will learn how to operate laboratory cleanrooms and create devices at the facilities of Ohio State’s Nanotech West Laboratory, which contains the largest cleanroom facility in the state.

Huson said that through expanding semiconductor manufacturing research, Ohio State will help other Ohio universities advance research opportunities for students and eventually contribute to Intel’s workforce.

Sayre said students will be able to contribute directly to next-generation technologies and find future opportunities in Ohio.

“That’s why institutes like ours exist within the context of the university – to provide that for faculty and students, so we create these unique environments and opportunities where everyone’s talents can come together in an interdisciplinary and coordinated way. “Sayre said.

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Josh Park attracts NSF grant for heat reduction research in electronics – NEA Report https://cetril.org/josh-park-attracts-nsf-grant-for-heat-reduction-research-in-electronics-nea-report/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 20:25:50 +0000 https://cetril.org/josh-park-attracts-nsf-grant-for-heat-reduction-research-in-electronics-nea-report/ JONESBORO — An assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Arkansas State University is pursuing research with NASA’s Johnson Space Center on how to more effectively reduce heat buildup in electronic systems. Dr. Jeongmoon (Josh) Park’s grant proposal was approved by the National Science Foundation’s RII Track-4: Fellows Advancing Science and Technology (FAST) program for $174,864. […]]]>

JONESBORO — An assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Arkansas State University is pursuing research with NASA’s Johnson Space Center on how to more effectively reduce heat buildup in electronic systems.

Dr. Jeongmoon (Josh) Park’s grant proposal was approved by the National Science Foundation’s RII Track-4: Fellows Advancing Science and Technology (FAST) program for $174,864.

Before joining the faculty of the College of Engineering and Computer Science in 2021, Park completed her Ph.D. at Texas A&M, his master’s degree at Purdue and his bachelor’s degree at Korea Aerospace University.

Park of Dr. Jeongmoon (Josh)
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

He noted that the rapid development of technology has resulted in higher performance and smaller size in electronics. However, with increased circuit density and faster operating frequency, more heat is dissipated and must be removed.

The success of this project will lead to improved thermal performance of cold plates, thereby reducing the size and weight of equipment and saving energy.

“Traditional heat removal systems using a heat sink and fan often become insufficient to keep modern electronics at operating temperature, he explained in his grant proposal. “Therefore, this research is driven by the need to develop an advanced thermal management system to sufficiently remove the dissipated heat and keep the electronics below operating temperature, for better performance and greater reliability.”

In collaboration with NASA’s Johnson Space Center, it will design and develop an advanced cold plate heat exchanger that can remove heat more efficiently using vortex generators, an aerodynamic element, especially for spacecraft electronics inhabited.

Cold plates have coolant flow passages bounded by metal walls. The use of vortex generators in flow passages has great potential to improve heat transfer, Park continued.

“When better liquid cooling in the cold plates is achieved, it can lead to significant energy savings as well as a reduction in equipment size and weight. Ultimately, this research can support the design, development and implementation of the next generation of thermal management systems for electronics in space applications.

Press release


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